I usually start with my images fairly thought out before putting them onto linoleum so I can retrace it through carbon paper and maintain the composition. The image and any text must be reversed prior to this  (everyone forgets this once or twice).  Here the image has been inked onto the grey linoleum with a permanent marker. I like to dip a rag into red acrylic ink and rub it over the entire block afterwards; this will further seal your image and also make it very easy to see what you have cut away.      

I usually start with my images fairly thought out before putting them onto linoleum so I can retrace it through carbon paper and maintain the composition. The image and any text must be reversed prior to this  (everyone forgets this once or twice).

Here the image has been inked onto the grey linoleum with a permanent marker. I like to dip a rag into red acrylic ink and rub it over the entire block afterwards; this will further seal your image and also make it very easy to see what you have cut away.

 

 

I then will decide where the back, mid, and foregrounds will be and cut fine outlines around the areas that define them. Doing this helps set parameters for myself because after hours of focusing on small areas it is easy to loose track of the entire image plan. Removing the backgrounds or areas of minor details first helps to see your main subjects clearer.

I then will decide where the back, mid, and foregrounds will be and cut fine outlines around the areas that define them. Doing this helps set parameters for myself because after hours of focusing on small areas it is easy to loose track of the entire image plan. Removing the backgrounds or areas of minor details first helps to see your main subjects clearer.

I knew that i wanted sunlight to be pouring onto the left side of the stream bank so a long time was spent making small cuts for the  tall grass and highlights on the tree leaves 

I knew that i wanted sunlight to be pouring onto the left side of the stream bank so a long time was spent making small cuts for the  tall grass and highlights on the tree leaves 

cutting away more of an area will create lightness in the print. This is where the red ink wiped onto the block is useful in determining  if you have achieved your desired effect. you can always remove more, but replacing is very difficult.

cutting away more of an area will create lightness in the print. This is where the red ink wiped onto the block is useful in determining  if you have achieved your desired effect. you can always remove more, but replacing is very difficult.

boy.jpg

 The  finished lino block, inked and ready to print.  A previous test print showed his face was too  shadowed so  more was removed to lighten up  his features

I wanted to be sure the boy stood out in the composition so I cut away much of the area where the stream is besides the ripples he was creating

I wanted to be sure the boy stood out in the composition so I cut away much of the area where the stream is besides the ripples he was creating

a boy and his boat.jpg

The finished print

By adding small details like the railing in the Tillicum Crossing Bridge and less in the receding bridges, the illusion of distance is created in the stream. small nicks and cuts can say a lot in a print.

By adding small details like the railing in the Tillicum Crossing Bridge and less in the receding bridges, the illusion of distance is created in the stream. small nicks and cuts can say a lot in a print.

tools.jpg

My go-to tools  for linocut preperation:

 

lino block, ink, pencil and sharpie, toothbrush for cleaning away lino chips, small cutting tools, and a large U-gouge tool for clearing large spaces